This summer, learn with us to help your schools not just recover, but reset and build necessary capacity. In these offerings, we are drawing on our work for 42 years as a hub of learning for independent and international school educators and leaders. We are offering online courses that allow educators to learn wise, flexible concepts, frameworks, and practices to inform teaching and learning in a variety of modes of instruction. These courses will be hybrid in design, featuring multimedia asynchronous elements, synchronous community learning and building elements, feedback and discussion groups, and coaching.

These experiences bring together educators from different schools. We also encourage teams of educators from the same school to participate together.

Registration Information:

  • Pricing: The cost is $99 per participant per workshop. As this cost is intentionally low, we are not able to offer group discounts.
  • Individual registration: Please use our online registration form. Note that you will not receive an automatic email confirmation as the registrations are processed manually. You will receive an email in 1-2 business days with registration confirmation and instructions for remitting payment.
  • Group registration: If you wish to register a group from your school, please email klingenstein@tc.columbia.edu.  

 

The research about how children learn based on the science of learning now powerfully informs the day-to-day practice of any teacher. This 5-day workshop for PreK-12 teachers, involving both synchronous and asynchronous formats, will first explore the current understanding of how the brain makes, stores, and retrieves memories in order to critically reflect, creatively think, make decisions, and problem solve. In the process, we will derive essential principles of learning through the lens of cognitive science, including the role of student beliefs and mindsets as crucial determiners of student success, especially as influenced by belonging, uncertainty, and sense of purpose. Along the way we will investigate an array of teaching strategies and assessment techniques emerging from these learning principles as they are applied in different educational contexts, both in-person and online. An important focus of this workshop will be the central importance feedback plays in deep and enduring learning for students of all ages and capabilities, and ways we can assure feedback is productively used to move their learning forward and recover unrealized bandwidth.

The workshop experience will include facilitated, synchronous time with workshop participants and leaders, and asynchronous learning time. Course activities include interactive mini-lectures, live small group discussions, instructional videos, optional discussion forums, and an array of useful readings and reflection prompts to deepen understanding and considerations of practical applications. Klingenstein Center coaches will provide asynchronous feedback on discussion thread comments and participant-submitted work. During the 5-day workshop, participants can expect three to four hours of work per day. Synchronous Zoom sessions will be held Monday from 9:00-11:30 am EST, Wednesday from 1:00-2:30 pm EST, and Friday from 1:00-3:00 pm EST. 


Facilitator: Kevin Mattingly

Kevin Mattingly has been a science teacher, administrator, and coach for 35 years in day and boarding schools. He was a lead teacher in the Klingenstein Center's Summer Institute for 17 years and has taught in their year-long and summer master’s leadership programs for the past 15 years. In collaboration with the Center, he was also the primary content author of the edX MOOC, The Science of Learning—What Every Teacher Should Know, and has most recently worked with schools in China, Vietnam, Tanzania, and India incorporating best practice instructional and assessment strategies based on cognitive science research. He holds a Ph.D. in ecology and a B.A. in biological sciences from Indiana University.


Note: This workshop offers separate strands for teachers and for administrators. Both strands are primarily asynchronous with feedback and will hold brief synchronous meetings on July 6 and July 10 from 9:00-9:30 am EST. 

  • Teacher Strand
    Now more than ever, teachers need to communicate why they teach the way they do for student learning and thriving to parents and caregivers. Since school moved home in March due to COVID-19, parents have increasingly shared their beliefs about what learning should look like or entail, and some of their comments reveal misconceptions about the science of learning. In support of teachers who have not had to communicate with parents on the level that the current crisis is demanding, this workshop will provide participants with tools to communicate with parents with confidence and empathy.
  • Leader Strand
    School leaders have always needed to communicate the why behind their decisions and actions, and now more than ever they need to clearly and empathetically communicate with parents and caregivers. Since school moved home in March due to COVID-19, various constituencies have reported their perceptions of teacher and school performance, and some of their comments reveal misconceptions about the science of learning. In support of department, division, and school leaders who have not had to communicate at the level that the current crisis is demanding, this workshop will provide participants with tools to communicate with confidence and empathy.

Facilitator: Jessica Flaxman

Jessica Flaxman, is currently a partner at 120 Education Consultancy, where she advises schools on innovation, program alignment, professional development, recruitment, and storytelling. Prior to joining 120, she taught upper school English and served as advisor, admission counselor, department chair, director of studies, and assistant head at a number of co-ed and single-sex independent day schools. Jessica is author of the education blog, What I Learned Today in School, manages the book review site bookclique.org, and is an editor of Well-Schooled, the site for educator storytelling, and serves on the editorial board of Klingbrief. She holds a B.A. from Wesleyan University, and an M.A. and Ed.M from Teachers College, Columbia University.



The research about how children learn based on the science of learning now powerfully informs the day-to-day practice of any teacher. This 5-day workshop for PreK-12 teachers, involving both synchronous and asynchronous formats, will first explore the current understanding of how the brain makes, stores, and retrieves memories in order to critically reflect, creatively think, make decisions, and problem solve. In the process, we will derive essential principles of learning through the lens of cognitive science, including the role of student beliefs and mindsets as crucial determiners of student success, especially as influenced by belonging, uncertainty, and sense of purpose. Along the way we will investigate an array of teaching strategies and assessment techniques emerging from these learning principles as they are applied in different educational contexts, both in-person and online. An important focus of this workshop will be the central importance feedback plays in deep and enduring learning for students of all ages and capabilities, and ways we can assure feedback is productively used to move their learning forward and recover unrealized bandwidth.

The workshop experience will include facilitated, synchronous time with workshop participants and leaders, and asynchronous learning time. Course activities include interactive mini-lectures, live small group discussions, instructional videos, optional discussion forums, and an array of useful readings and reflection prompts to deepen understanding and considerations of practical applications. Klingenstein Center coaches will provide asynchronous feedback on discussion thread comments and participant-submitted work. During the 5-day workshop, participants can expect three to four hours of work per day. Synchronous Zoom sessions will be held Monday from 9:00-11:30 am EST, Wednesday from 1:00-2:30 pm EST, and Friday from 1:00-3:00 pm EST. 

Facilitator: Kevin Mattingly

 

Kevin Mattingly has been a science teacher, administrator, and coach for 35 years in day and boarding schools. He was a lead teacher in the Klingenstein Center's Summer Institute for 17 years and has taught in their year-long and summer master’s leadership programs for the past 15 years. In collaboration with the Center, he was also the primary content author of the edX MOOC, The Science of Learning—What Every Teacher Should Know, and has most recently worked with schools in China, Vietnam, Tanzania, and India incorporating best practice instructional and assessment strategies based on cognitive science research. He holds a Ph.D. in ecology and a B.A. in biological sciences from Indiana University.


This workshop welcomes anyone in a school community who is interested in learning about the emotional aspects of change in schools. This two-day synchronous workshop and the toolkit introduced within it is designed to help participants:

  • Develop an understanding of the emotional complexities of change and transition
  • Reflect on the current state of emotions around change at your school at the individual, team, and community levels
  • Develop action steps to support the emotional well-being of your community members
  • Consider how to build a community of learners to sustain the emotional well-being of a school

This workshop welcomes anyone in a school community who is interested in learning about the emotional aspects of change in schools. ​The sessions will be held synchronously on Zoom on July 15 from 9:00 am - 3:00 pm EST (with a lunch break) and on July 16 from 9:00 am - noon EST.

Facilitator: Rebecca Stilwell

Dr. Rebecca Stilwell consults with various organizations and supports work in schools, districts, and organizations around managing change, developing school culture, professional collaboration, leadership development, strategic planning, and curriculum design as well as research and evaluation. Prior to becoming an organizational psychologist, Rebecca taught in public, private, and international schools. She currently teaches education research methods in the Klingenstein Center's master’s degree programs. Her research focuses on leaders’ behaviors that support effective change and approaches to change in education.


This workshop introduces participants to the dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression and how these systems manifest in our schools and the larger world. Participants will discover the language of social justice, and explore models to create more equitable communities. The workshop will also provide examples of equity and anti-oppression interventions within schools in the United States to help us imagine further interventions and next strategies. Participants are encouraged to continue their learning journey beyond their time in this workshop with a co-created toolkit designed around the questions they are interested in exploring next.

Learning objectives:

  • Develop a working understanding of intersectionality
  • Understand the language and foundational thinking regarding anti-oppressive, anti-racism, and equity practices to help facilitate independent learning and action
  • Reflect on internalized, interpersonal, and institutional oppression
  • Reflect on power, privilege, and oppression in relation to our schools; reflect on institutional assumptions, attitudes, and external postures through these lenses
  • Ask questions that foster learning 
  • Learn strategies and solutions to engage in anti-oppression work in our personal lives and in our schools
  • Design a personal anti-oppression learning plan and learn about tools that can be used immediately in practice and for further learning
The workshop experience will be mainly asynchronous with optional synchronous opportunities for dialogue, questions, coaching, and feedback. There will be one synchronous session on Monday, July 20th from noon-1:00 PM EST, which will be recorded for those unable to attend. During the 5-day workshop, participants can expect four to five hours of work per day.


Facilitator: Nicole Furlonge

Dr. Nicole Furlonge is Professor of Practice and Director of the Klingenstein Center. She earned her B.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of Pennsylvania, and her M.A. from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining Teachers College, Dr. Furlonge served at independent schools in roles that included director of teaching and learning, department chair, and director of diversity. Dr. Furlonge is also the author of Race Sounds: The Art of Listening in African American Literature, which posits listening as an interpretive and civic act that leads to deeper engagement with difference. Currently her research examines the intersections between listening, cognitive neuroscience, social justice, and school leadership.



Early-childhood and elementary educators face particular challenges when designing for online or remote learning for the young learners in their classrooms. In this workshop, participants will learn to create authentic learning opportunities for their students that are flexible, robust, and effectively support student learning, wellbeing, belonging, and thriving. Sample questions include: What are best practices for building a learning community in a flexible Pre-K-6 classroom? How might we cultivate peer-to-peer relationships for our students when we are not in the same place? How might we provide feedback and design authentic assessments? How might we help parents understand how to be more effective partners in their child’s learning?

Participants should expect 3-4 hours of work per day. Synchronous sessions will be held daily between 10:00 am and noon EST and will include a mix of whole group, small group, and individual work. Friday's synchronous session will be optional office hours. You will leave this workshop with concrete plans that you have created during this experience such as: a plan for back-to-school night, strategies to use when creating a new community remotely, or the design of an authentic assessment.

Facilitators: Julia Alexander, Jenel Giles, Jessica Han, and Kripa Sundar

Julia Alexander is a second grade teacher at The Pike School. Prior to joining Pike, Julia taught lower school at Shady Hill School in Cambridge, where she was also the facilitator for the faculty/staff SEED group that explored issues of identity, diversity, and inclusion. She earned her B.A. in history and Spanish from Barnard College, and her M.A. in Reading Specialist and Ed.M in Education Leadership from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Jenel Giles is an early childhood educator and school leader with fifteen years of classroom experience in New York City independent schools. She has a degree in early childhood education from Bank Street College of Education and an Ed.M in private school leadership from the Klingenstein Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is currently the Lower School Director at Moorestown Friends School in Moorestown, New Jersey and serves as a lead teacher in the Klingenstein Summer Institute for Early-Career Teachers.

Jessica Han is currently a Grade 3 Head Teacher at The Spence School in New York City and has served as a lead teacher in the Klingenstein Summer Institute for Early-Career Teachers. Jessica earned her M.A. in elementary inclusive education with a dual license in special education from Teachers College. Before starting at Spence, she worked at a New York City public school in integrated co-teaching classrooms. Her professional interests include curriculum design, project-based learning, and using design-thinking methods with elementary students.

Dr. Kripa Sundar is a learning scientist who believes that everyone—teachers, students, and parents—can benefit from knowing ways to make learning more efficient, effective, and engaging. With a background in multimedia learning, she has published numerous studies on the science of learning, specifically in regards to retrieval practice, concept mapping, and the seductive details effect. Her interests also include experiential learning, research evaluation, science-driven teaching and learning strategies, and the role of education technology in instruction. In addition to her research, Kripa enjoys sharing her learning through teaching, consulting, and various outreach initiatives.


What makes a story and what stories do you carry? You all have stories from your life experience and in the education field that only you can tell. This set of five modules will help you unlock and share them. Reflect on your process of writing and sharing stories. Dive deeper into storytelling fundamentals with relevant resources. Critique articles from regarded online outlets using these principles. Learn to write and package content so it leverages your uniqueness and resonates with your chosen audience. Write and submit an original essay to complete your time here.  

Facilitators: Jessica Flaxman and Ari Pinkus

Jessica Flaxman, is currently a partner at 120 Education Consultancy, where she advises schools on innovation, program alignment, professional development, recruitment, and storytelling. Prior to joining 120, she taught upper school English and served as advisor, admission counselor, department chair, director of studies, and assistant head at a number of co-ed and single-sex independent day schools. Jessica is author of the education blog, What I Learned Today in School, manages the book review site bookclique.org, and is an editor of Well-Schooled, the site for educator storytelling, and serves on the editorial board of Klingbrief. She holds a B.A. from Wesleyan University, and an M.A. and Ed.M from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Ari Pinkus is currently senior editor and project manager for the American Communities Project at The George Washington University, where she works with data to explore socioeconomic, health, political, and cultural trends across the country. Previously, she was digital editor/producer at the National Association of Independent Schools, and has held writing and editing roles at ABC News and The Christian Science Monitor. She holds an M.P.A from New York University and a B.A. from Penn State University.


For questions or group registration, contact the Klingenstein Center at klingenstein@tc.columbia.edu.
 
KlingensteinCenter Teachers College Columbia University

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